'This slaughter on our streets has to stop,' judge tells Sheffield killer as he jails him for 27 years for stabbing THREE men

Khalid Mokadeh (left) fatally stabbed beloved dad, Sami Al-Saroori, through the heart on September 9 last year
Khalid Mokadeh (left) fatally stabbed beloved dad, Sami Al-Saroori, through the heart on September 9 last year

‘It is one thing to lose your child to illness - but to lose them to an aggressive knife attack is just senseless’ - the mother of a Sheffield man said, as his killer was jailed.

At the age of just 22, Khalid Mokadeh was put behind bars for 27 years, during a hearing held at Sheffield Crown Court yesterday, for three stabbings carried out on the Wensley Estate in Page Hall between May and September last year.

Khalid Mokadeh, 22, was jailed for 27 years today for the fatal stabbing of Sami Al-Saroori and two additional knife attacks

Khalid Mokadeh, 22, was jailed for 27 years today for the fatal stabbing of Sami Al-Saroori and two additional knife attacks

The final of Mokadeh’s knife attacks caused the death of dad-of-one, Sami Al-Saroori, after he stabbed him in the heart during an altercation outside a house party in Wensley Gardens on the evening of September 9, 2017.

'Knife crime has reached epidemic proportions'

As he jailed him, Judge Paul Watson QC told the court he was in no doubt Mokadeh is a ‘very dangerous young man’.

“There would be justifiable outrage if a case such as this was not met with the most condign punishment. Somehow, this slaughter on our streets has to stop,” said Judge Watson.

Sami Al-Saroori was just 31-years-old when he died on September 10 last year

Sami Al-Saroori was just 31-years-old when he died on September 10 last year

He added: “Knife crime, not just in this city, but across the country has reached epidemic proportions...the public are rightly anxious that if the courts do not take knife crime seriously the epidemic will only spread.”

READ MORE: 'You have ruined our lives,' wife of Sheffield stab victim tells killer

Judge Watson also sentenced Mokadeh to an extended license period of three years, due to him posing a ‘substantial risk of the commission of further offences involving the use of knives’.

In a victim impact statement read out in court, Mr Al-Saroori’s mother, Sabrah, said: “It is one thing to lose your child to illness, but to lose them to an aggressive knife attack is just senseless.”

Sami with his wife Martina.

Sami with his wife Martina.

She added: “Khalid Mokadeh has shown no remorse for what he has done. He does not seem to have any understanding of what he has done to our family.”

Mokadeh was put on trial for Sami’s murder in February, but jurors found him guilty of manslaughter, by way of loss of control, in March following a four week trial.

The Star has only been able to report the outcome of the trial today (Wednesday, August 22), due to reporting restrictions put in place by Judge Watson in order to allow proceedings concerning Mokadeh’s second stabbing to go ahead with out causing a risk of prejudice to potential jurors.

The defendant carried out three stabbings on the Wensley Estate over four months

Sami pictured with his daughter, Amelia.

Sami pictured with his daughter, Amelia.

The first stabbing carried out by Mokadeh, who is also known as ‘K-Mocks,’ was committed against Mr Al-Saroori’s brother, Mohammed, on the Wensley Estate on May 25 last year.

Prosecutor, Nicholas Campbell QC, told the court that Mokadeh stabbed Mohammed with what the complainant described as a ‘jagged, rambo-style blade’, after he attempted to ‘come between’ Mokadeh and another man he was arguing with.

After Mokadeh swore at him, Mohammed walked away from the scene of the altercation, but Mokadeh came after him.

Mr Campbell said: “He turned to his left, only to see K-Mocks walking by him. He saw something shiny in his right hand as D made a move towards his groin. He felt a sharp sting. Before he could react, K-Mocks had also thrust the knife into the side of his chest. His right bicep was also cut.”

The stab wound to Mohammed’s groin resulted in a serious injury to his small bowel, for which he needed to have emergency surgery and resection.

READ MORE: 'Callous' killer laughed and made obscene gesture at victim's family as he was found guilty of manslaughter

Mokadeh initially denied stabbing Mohammed and said the Al-Saroori family had ‘fabricated’ the allegation about the attack on Mohammed in the wake of Sami’s death in a bid to get revenge.

He later admitted to it after the prosecution had closed their case against him during the first trial.

In the early hours of June 15 last year, Mokadeh was shot in the leg while on the Wensley Estate. Mokadeh later told friends, as well as Sabrah Al-Saroori, he believed Sami had ‘ordered’ the shooting.

Just three days before killing 31-year-old Sami, Mokadeh stabbed a man called Fathi Dahir in the buttock as he walked down an alleyway off Hinde House Crescent on the Wensley Estate just before midnight on September 6, 2017.

Junior prosecutor, Richard Thyne, described how Mokadeh stabbed Fathi, who was unknown to him, after branding him a ‘snitch’.

Mokadeh initially denied any involvement in the incident, but eventually pleaded guilty to wounding Fathi on the morning of his second trial on Monday, August 20 this year.

Sheffield Crown Court heard how in the hours running up to Sami’s death, Mokadeh arrived at the house party in Wensley Gardens uninvited, where Sami was enjoying spending time with friends.

After drinking in the kitchen alone, Mokadeh was the last to leave the party. Upon finding Sami outside on the street, he stabbed him in the chest with such force the knife went through his sternum bone and into his heart.

Jury concluded there must have been a 'trigger event'

Judge Watson said that because the jury found Mokadeh guilty of manslaughter, by way of loss of self control, they must have concluded there was a ‘trigger event’ that led to Mokadeh lashing out and stabbing Sami.

He said he would therefore sentence Mokadeh based on his evidence that he stabbed Sami after he forcefully grabbed his arm.

Mokadeh's mitigation

Nicholas Worsley, defending, told the court that after being shot in the leg, Mokadeh was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Mr Worsley said:“He was a young man who was troubled, suffering the after effects of the shooting.

“He was under stress and strain.”
He said Mokadeh was also suffering from ‘hyper vigilance and paranoia’ in the wake of the shooting, and had even stabbed himself in the weeks following it.