Sheffield United: Blades could vote '˜yes' to controversial Football League proposal

Sheffield United 'broadly support' a controversial proposal to reorganise the Football League, The Star can reveal.

Wednesday, 25th May 2016, 9:46 am
Updated Wednesday, 25th May 2016, 10:33 am
Sheffield United's co-owners Kevin McCabe and HRH Prince Abdullah bin Mosaad © BLADES SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY

But Bramall Lane’s hierarchy, including co-owners Kevin McCabe and HRH Prince Abdullah Bin Mosaad Abdulaziz Al Saud, will await further details of the plan before deciding which way to vote at the governing body’s annual conference in Portugal next month.

The radical shakeup, which could see the competition split into four divisions of 20 clubs, was branded “ridiculous” by Bradford City’s Mark Lawn when it was first mooted last week. But others, including

The League One club's co-owners are seeking further details of the Football League's proposals © BLADES SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY

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Paul Scally, have declared the idea worthy of further exploration although, like the Gillingham chairman, United are expected to voice concerns they received no prior notice of Thursday’s announcement.

Mark Lawn of Bradford City says the plan is "ridiculous"

FL members will begin discussing the overhaul when they arrive in the Algarve on June 9 before reaching a binding decision at 2017’s summit. Those advocating the changes, which could see eight new teams admitted ahead of the 2019/20 season, require 90 per cent to declare their support in order for it to be implemented.

Shaun Harvey, the FL’s chief executive, has been described as a “driver” of the deal which is also backed by Richard Scudamore and Martin Glenn; his counterparts at the Premier League and Football Association respectively.

But Gillingham chairman Paul Scally believes it is worthy of further exploration
The League One club's co-owners are seeking further details of the Football League's proposals © BLADES SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY
Mark Lawn of Bradford City says the plan is "ridiculous"
But Gillingham chairman Paul Scally believes it is worthy of further exploration