Sheffield passengers express anger over rail fare increases 

Rail fare increases have sparked fierce debate among Sheffield Star readers. 

Ticket prices have risen this week by an average of 3.1 per cent with some season fares increasing by more than £100.

Protests outside Sheffield railway station this morning at the increase in rail prices. Picture: Steve Ellis

Protests outside Sheffield railway station this morning at the increase in rail prices. Picture: Steve Ellis

Members of the Sheffield Heeley Labour party, Sheffield Trades Union Council and the Green Party all protested against the rise outside Sheffield train station on Wednesday. 

After we reported the news, a number of readers took to Facebook to voice their opinions on the changes.   

Andy Wilson posted: “I’m going to have to start walking to York every day.”

Joyce Kathleen added: “These fare rises are ridiculous as people may stop using the trains and find alternative way to travel. You can travel cheaper by coach than by train.” 

Kieron Willans said: “It was Labour who introduced the present formula for rail fare increases in 2004.

“No rise is welcome but the rail companies have little or no choice but to increase fares as it is the Department for Transport that dictates this.”   

One in seven trains were delayed by at least five minutes in the past 12 months as timetable changes caused chaos.

Passengers were warned to face further disruption throughout January as members of the RMT union remain locked in a bitter dispute over the role of guards.

The 3.1 per cent average fare rise is the second highest since January 2013.

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling marked the increase in fares by announcing that a new railcard to extend child fares to 16 and 17-year-olds will be available in time for the new academic year in September.

Mr Grayling claimed the Government's ‘record investment’  in the rail network will help passengers get the ‘frequent, affordable and reliable journeys they deserve’

The Department for Transport has also commissioned a root and branch review of Britain's railway, including fares.