Flying Scotsman to steam back into Doncaster today – and here’s where and when you can see it

World famous locomotive the Flying Scotsman is to steam back into its Doncaster birthplace later today.

The iconic steam loco will travel the East Coast Main Line between London King’s Cross and York as a tribute to the man who rescued it from the USA.

British businessman Sir William McAlpine bought the famed locomotive for £25,000 back in 1973 and today’s journey – which will culminate in a special ceremony at York’s National Railway Museum is to remember him following his death last year.

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Hauling ‘The Scotsman Salute’, it will departing London Kings Cross at 08:23 and will head via Finsbury Park (08:33), Alexandra Palace (08:43), Potters Bar (08:59), Welwyn Garden City (09:09), Knebworth (09:16), Stevenage (09:20), Sandy (09:38), Peterborough (10:35), Grantham (11:16), Newark North Gate (11:29), Doncaster (12:32), and finally York at 13:13.

Fans are being advised that the best place to see the locomotive will be as it arrives at Doncaster railway station after lunchtime.

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Enthusiasts are also been warned to stay off the railway tracks as it heads north as previous journeys have been disrupted by fans trying to get a closer look.

The Scotsman, built to the designs of Sir Nigel Gresley in Doncaster in 1923, will conclude its trip at York where newly repainted Class 90 90028 will be named in honour of Sir William McAlpine.

The return journey will be made by the Class 90 which will depart York at 17:37, via Doncaster (18:08), Retford (18:21), Grantham (18:50), Peterborough (19:16), Sandy (19:45), Stevenage (20:00), Welwyn North (20:07), Hatfield (20:10), Potters Bar (20:13) and London Kings Cross at 20:26.

READ MORE: Doncaster’s Flying Scotsman steams ahead

All timings are subject to change.

Sir William saved the Flying Scotsman when it was being stored at an army base in California after then owner Alan Pegler lost his personal fortune by touring it in the US.

Amid fears the locomotive would never return to the UK, Sir William negotiated a rescue deal and it was brought back across the Atlantic.

He then paid for it to be restored and resume main line operations.