VIDEO: Swan rescued after becoming tangled in fishing wire at Doncaster pond

This is the moment RSPCA oficers resuced a swan from death after untangling it from fishing wire dumped in a Doncaster lake.

The footage shows officers untangling fishing line from around the frightened bird's throat during a clean-up of Martinwells Lake at Edlington.

One of the swans rescued after becoming tangled in fishing wire at Martinwells Lake.

One of the swans rescued after becoming tangled in fishing wire at Martinwells Lake.

WARNING: VIDEO CONTAINS SCENES SOME VIEWERS MAY FIND UPSETTING

And they are calling on anglers not to dump fishing tackle in the regions waterways after a spate of bird rescues over the summer.

RSPCA inspector John Gibson organised the clean up at Martinwells Lake - formerly known as the Brick Pond - after the charity received repeated calls about injured swans and other birds at the lake.

This summer the RSPCA was called out four times to help cygnets who were caught in fishing litter.

Some of the dumped fishing tackle found by RSPCA officers.

Some of the dumped fishing tackle found by RSPCA officers.

Fortunately all survived but one is still receiving rehabilitative treatment at RSPCA Stapeley Grange Wildlife Centre after getting a hook embedded in its throat.

While carrying out the clean up on Tuesday, an adult swan was found with fishing line wrapped around its neck and Inspector Gibson worked tirelessly for three hours alongside specialist flood officer Tamsin Drysdale and specialist inland boat team members Ben Cottle-Shaw and Sandra Dransfield to clear the lake of litter to help prevent any more wildlife becoming injured.

Inspector Gibson said: “There are a pair of nesting swans on this lake who have this year raised eight cygnets - four of which we have already been called out to rescue.

“We are also finding other birds get stuck on the island on this lake because they become trapped in discarded fishing wire.

The rubbish cleared from the lake after a massive clean up.

The rubbish cleared from the lake after a massive clean up.

“We decided we had to do something proactive after getting so many calls about the same location.

“This situation is totally avoidable. I would strongly urge those who enjoy fishing to be extra cautious when packing up to make sure no litter is left behind. Also I’d ask people to be careful when casting that they don’t go too far and become entangled in the island on this lake.

“Most anglers are very responsible when disposing of their litter, but it only takes one careless person to endanger the life of an animal.

“If any member of the public sees discarded litter around if they could pick it up and put it in the bin they may save an animal’s life.

“All sorts of litter can cause problems, line can wrap around necks causing deep wounds in flesh and cutting off the blood supply, hooks can pierce beaks, become embedded in skin or get caught in bird's throats, and weights can be swallowed causing internal injuries and blockages.”

RSPCA tips to help tackle the problem include:

* Take unwanted fishing line home and cut it into pieces before putting in the bin.

* Be aware of surrounding trees – discarded line caught in foliage can entangle wildlife.

* Don’t leave bait unattended – always remove from the hook and put it in a safe place.

* Use a bait box – this will reduce the chances of leaving behind an empty bait tin by mistake.

* Don’t leave hooks, weights or other paraphernalia behind.

The lake, formerly the Brick Pond, was the site of the horrific attack on two young boys by two brothers who were jailed for an indeterminate time following the crime in 2009.