VIDEO: South Yorks still burns with Thatcher hatred

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Thirty years may have passed, but the emotions are as bitter and divided as they ever were.

To chanting and cheers, thousands massed in South Yorkshire to burn an effigy in a mock coffin on a fire of fury in the old mining village of Goldthorpe, at the same time as Baroness Thatcher’s funeral got under way.

Funeral 'celebrations': Anti-Thatcher protesters set fire to an effigy of her in Goldthorpe, South Yorkshire.

Funeral 'celebrations': Anti-Thatcher protesters set fire to an effigy of her in Goldthorpe, South Yorkshire.

In London, South Yorkshire MPs Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband were among the mourners led by the Queen who attended the former Prime Minister’s service.

Hundreds of people, including many ex-miners, attended the event in Goldthorpe, where anger over Thatcher’s policies remains raw and the scars caused by her controversial pit closure programme have never fully healed.

VIDEO: Press the play button to watch our video report.

MORE VIDEO: For more reaction and images - CLICK HERE.

Protest: One of the thousands of anti-Thatcher protestors who gathered in Goldthrope, South Yorkshire.

Protest: One of the thousands of anti-Thatcher protestors who gathered in Goldthrope, South Yorkshire.

FUNERAL VIDEO: Watch our report of the funeral in London - CLICK HERE.

Crowds gathered at outside the Union Jack Memorial Club where an effigy of the late Tory leader hung from a noose beside signs that read: “Thatcher the milk snatcher” and “Thatcher the scab”.

Some turned up in National Coal Board-style overalls, complete with soot-blackened faces, hard hats and headlamps.

Three traditional pit and NUM banners which extolled the virtues of socialism, collectivism and unity were paraded past, prompting applause.

The coffin of former British prime minister Baroness Margaret Thatcher is carried by the Bearer Party as it arrives for her funeral service at St Paul's Cathedral, London.

The coffin of former British prime minister Baroness Margaret Thatcher is carried by the Bearer Party as it arrives for her funeral service at St Paul's Cathedral, London.

And songs including Rod Stewart’s Maggie May, which includes the line “Wake up Maggie, I think I’ve got something to say to you”, and Going Underground by The Jam were played from the club.

Among those marking the event was former miner Tony Hiles, who worked in the local pit and picketed throughout the notorious 1984/85 miners’ strike.

He said: “I’m not a bitter man, I don’t hate people. But I have no feelings for her. I couldn’t care less that she’s died.

“Margaret Thatcher decimated all this area. We had eight pits in a five-mile radius. The town used to be buzzing, in the villages everyone would go out. And she shut every single one. There’s nothing left.”

Funeral: The coffin bearing the body of Baroness Thatcher is moved from the Palace of Westminster, where it rested overnight in the chapel of St Mary Undercroft, as it makes it's way to her funeral service, at St Paul's Cathedral, central London.

Funeral: The coffin bearing the body of Baroness Thatcher is moved from the Palace of Westminster, where it rested overnight in the chapel of St Mary Undercroft, as it makes it's way to her funeral service, at St Paul's Cathedral, central London.

Robbie Conroy, of Doncaster, a miner for 32 years, said Baroness Thatcher was “a witch” and it was “a great day for working-class people”.

He said: “The working-class has been slaughtered by this woman. There’s young people here who weren’t alive when the strike was on but the feeling is still here.”

Some residents made their own show of hatred for the woman who they claim ruined their community, including one home that displayed a huge sign saying: “The Lady’s not for turning but tonight she’ll be for burning.”

People stopped to take photos of the Rusty Dudley pub in the high street, which was decked out with bunting and banners that said: “Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, Thatcher’s Britain has gone bust” and “That’s another fine mess you’ve got us into Maggie”.

At 1pm, a horse and cart pulled up to the club bearing a replica coffin containing an effigy of Baroness Thatcher.

It was manned by someone in a Margaret Thatcher mask who was drinking milk.

Funeral: Margaret Thatcher

Funeral: Margaret Thatcher

A piper played as the horse-drawn carriage led a parade up the street, followed by crowds numbering the high-hundreds.

At around 3.10pm the mock coffin was carried to waste ground by a row of derelict terrace houses behind the Rusty Dudley.

Fireworks were set off before it was placed on a pyre, along with a floral wreath that spelled SCAB - a scathing term synonymous with the 1984/85 miners’ strike.

It was then lit to cries of “scab, scab, scab” and loud cheers.

Several onlookers spat on the coffin as flames took hold.

One man dressed as the devil held up a plaque as part of a silent protest that read “the devil has come for Thatcher the children’s milk snatcher”.

Other former pit villages in South Yorkshire decided to ignore Baroness Thatcher’s funeral.

In nearby Grimethorpe, only a handful of people turned out to watch the service on the TV in the working men’s club - and none seemed particularly interested in what was happening.

Former coal miner Jim Sellars, 52, turned up in full mining gear complete with a blackened face.

He said he had come to drink to the memory of his father, also a miner, and not to watch the ceremony.

Asked about the cost of the London funeral, he said: “I think it’s disgusting.

“We have to pay for our own funerals so why didn’t she pay for hers.

“It’s £10 million that could be put into the community.”

Around Grimethorpe, whose colliery band inspired the 1996 film Brassed Off, former miners had put up a range of signs and banners.

On the old pit winding wheel, at the northern entrance to the village, one banner said: “Thatcher died naturally but she murdered our pit.”

And on a footbridge over the main road at the other end of the village, another read: “No tears for Thatcher.”

Outside the working men’s club, one small banner said: “At Last.”

Roads in Goldthorpe, including the high street, were brought to a complete standstill due to the number of spectators, with cars and buses having to turn back.

But South Yorkshire Police said the event passed off peacefully and praised the behaviour of those who took part.

A force spokesperson said: “Events held across South Yorkshire associated with the funeral of Baroness Thatcher appear to have taken place safely with minimal disruption to the wider public.

“It has been an emotive day for many people across the county and we are still encouraging people to behave sensibly at any events taking place this evening.

“We are pleased that people have exercised their right to peaceful assembly.”

Baroness Thatcher was granted the honour of a ceremonial funeral at St Paul’s Cathedral in the presence of the Queen, dignitaries from around the world and all of her successors as prime minister.

The United Kingdom’s first female prime minister was given full military honours as the coffin bearing her body was brought to the cathedral in procession, through streets lined with mourners, on a gun carriage drawn by six black horses.

At St Paul’s, a congregation of more than 2,300 guests heard the Bishop of London Richard Chartres pay tribute to Lady Thatcher’s “perseverance in struggle and courage”.

Among those present were more than 30 members of the Iron Lady’s cabinets from 1979-90, including Lord Heseltine and Lord Howe, whose challenges to her leadership triggered her removal from power.

Every member of the current Cabinet attended, led by Prime Minister David Cameron, who gave a reading from the Gospel of St John. A clearly moved Chancellor George Osborne appeared to wipe tears from his eyes during the ceremony.

Lady Thatcher’s coffin, placed beneath the dome of St Paul’s, was draped in a Union flag and topped by a floral tribute of white roses bearing the handwritten note “Beloved Mother - Always in our Hearts” from her children Sir Mark and Carol Thatcher.

Walking ahead of the coffin as it entered the cathedral were Lady Thatcher’s grandchildren Michael and Amanda, carrying cushions bearing her insignia of the Order of the Garter and Order of Merit. Amanda also gave the first reading of the ceremony, from the King James Bible.

The bishop deliberately steered clear of discussing the former Conservative leader’s political legacy in his address, insisting that the funeral was “a place for ordinary human compassion of the kind that is reconciling... for the simple truths which transcend political debate”.

Although the event was not the state funeral received by Sir Winston Churchill, it was conducted with more pomp and ceremony than any seen in London since the death of the Queen Mother in 2002.

Mr Cameron insisted the funeral was a “fitting tribute” to a major national figure who was the longest-serving prime minister of the 20th century. He accepted that opinions remain divided over the legacy of Lady Thatcher, who died last week aged 87, but said she had created a new consensus during her time in power, telling BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “In a way, we are all Thatcherites now.”

Mounted Police escort the gun carriage, which will transport Baroness Thatcher's coffin to St Paul's Cathedral, up Whitehall, central London.

Mounted Police escort the gun carriage, which will transport Baroness Thatcher's coffin to St Paul's Cathedral, up Whitehall, central London.

Mounted Police escort the gun carriage, which will transport Baroness Thatcher's coffin to St Paul's Cathedral, up Whitehall, central London.

Mounted Police escort the gun carriage, which will transport Baroness Thatcher's coffin to St Paul's Cathedral, up Whitehall, central London.