The £17m vision for the future of estate

Artist's impression of the planned extra care development on the site of the former Dixon Road/Thompson Avenue in Edlington.
Artist's impression of the planned extra care development on the site of the former Dixon Road/Thompson Avenue in Edlington.

THIS is how one of Doncaster’s notorious anti-social behaviour hotspots is set to look following a £17 million transformation.

Building work it expected to start soon to breathe new life into the estate in Edlington - once dubbed Beirut.

This artist’s impression shows how derelict land in Dixon Road and Thompson Avenue is to be turned intp a housing complex for old people. The development will see 87 homes for sale built at a later date.

The project is being built by Doncaster firm Frank Haslam Milan for West Yorkshire-based organisation Housing 21, which has managed to obtain a £1 million Government grant towards the scheme.

The site has been empty for ten years since all the 1920s houses on it were demolished following years of arson attacks and yobbish behaviour.

Doncaster Council has granted permission for 64 apartments and 22 bungalows for older people which will be built around a horseshoe shaped garden area - with the rest as a separate housing estate.

Cath Bradbury, projects development manager for Housing 21, told the council’s planning committee it was “very proud” of the design and expected huge demand.

All the properties will be two-bed.

“We know from analysis in Doncaster there are between 32 and 49 applications for every bungalow that becomes available,” said Ms Bradbury.

“We wanted something that will be part of the community and this site is close to GPs, a clinic, pharmacy and library and there is a new supermarket close.

Proposing permission be granted, Coun Ted Kitchen described it as “one of the nicest things to happen to this community.”

The scheme has had to overcome funding obstacles since the housing market slump but the developers are confident sale of homes will finance the extra care provision.

Consultation was carried out by Housing 21 and there was no objections.

Edlington’s deputy mayor, Georgina Mullis, said the development was “desperately needed.”