School’s tribute to fallen hero Liam Maughan

Liam Maughan's family David, Andrea and Callum, 13, of Hatfield stand next to the plaque at the opening of the new resource centre named after Liam. Picture: Andrew Roe

Liam Maughan's family David, Andrea and Callum, 13, of Hatfield stand next to the plaque at the opening of the new resource centre named after Liam. Picture: Andrew Roe

0
Have your say

TEACHERS and pals of a fallen Doncaster war hero ensured he will not be forgotten - by naming part of their school after him.

Just days before Britain was due to hold its annual remembrance services, on Sunday, Rifles soldier Liam Maughan was honoured with a resources centre bearing his name at his former school.

maughanram'Undated MoD handout photo of Rifleman Liam Maughan of 3rd Battalion The Rifles, who has been named as the soldier who died from wounds received as a result of small arms fire which occurred near Sangin, in Helmand Province, during the morning of March 6. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday March 7, 2010. See PA story DEFENCE Afghanistan. Photo credit should read: MoD Crown Copyright/PA Wire

maughanram'Undated MoD handout photo of Rifleman Liam Maughan of 3rd Battalion The Rifles, who has been named as the soldier who died from wounds received as a result of small arms fire which occurred near Sangin, in Helmand Province, during the morning of March 6. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday March 7, 2010. See PA story DEFENCE Afghanistan. Photo credit should read: MoD Crown Copyright/PA Wire

The Liam Maughan Resource Centre was opened by the soldier’s mum Andrea, dad David, and younger brother Callum, watched by pals from his platoon, 3 Rifles, who tried to save his life on the battlefield.

Liam died after he was shot by the Taliban near Sangin in Helmand province in Afghanistan in March 2010. He was weeks away from returning home to see his new-born son Jaden for the first time.

But dad David, of Hatfield, said he felt the building carrying his name made sure he was not forgotten.

He said: “The feelings are bitter-sweet.

“What is important for us now is memory - for that is all we have of Liam now. “During the first few weeks after he was killed, Liam was 270th on the list of casualties in Afghanistan, and was just a few names from the top. Now you have to scroll down, and down, and down.

“The great concern as the list grew longer and his name disappeared from view was that I was worried that his name may disappear from people’s memory.

“Now I know I had no reason to be concerned.

“The naming of this centre will ensure Liam, and the sacrifice he made, will never be forgotten.”

A plaque will be displayed on the wall of the centre, along with a picture of Liam, and one of his Army uniforms.

David added he felt Liam would have loved having the centre named after him, and the ceremony to open it, which was held on the same day the former Hatfield High School was re-opened as Ash Hill Academy.

He said: “He would have loved it, I think it is safe to say it is just up his street. He would be looking down liking it. He loved to be the centre of attention.”

Former Army colleagues from Liam’s platoon travelled down from their base in Edinburgh to attend the ceremony. Corporal James Taylor, from Sprotbrough, said his old platoon had been keen to see something to remember Liam.

He said: “We wanted to see something so that he was not just a fading memory - this is amazing. It means a lot to us.”

He said the platoon had been keen to keep in touch with Liam’s family to offer any help they could.

Academy principal Dave Williams said he had taught Liam and knew him well during his five-and-a-half years at the school, describing him as one of the most laid-back pupils.

He said: “When he was tragically killed on March 6, 2010, it had a massive impact on his family and us as a community. We felt it was fitting that we opened something in honour of Liam and the work he did when he was in the Army.”