Pegida march in Rotherham will go ahead, say police

Tommy Robinson (centre), at an EDL rally in Sheffield in 2013. He is now leader of the Pegida group who are marching through Rotherham on Saturday.
Tommy Robinson (centre), at an EDL rally in Sheffield in 2013. He is now leader of the Pegida group who are marching through Rotherham on Saturday.

A ‘silent march’ by an anti-Islamic group through Rotherham will be allowed to go ahead this weekend, police have confirmed.

South Yorkshire Police said the ‘criteria required to prevent a procession’ has not been met after an open letter was sent by representatives of the Muslim community in Rotherham asking the force’s interim chief constable Dave Jones asking for the march to be called off.

The Pegida group, led by English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson, is planning a ‘silent walk’ in the town on Saturday afternoon in relation to the town’s child sexual exploitation scandal.

The march will follow speeches outside Rotherham Town Hall.

Local councillors, business owners and groups such as British Muslim Youth, the Rotherham Muslim Community Forum and the Rotherham Council of Mosques had signed a letter calling for the march to be called off - citing fears about racial tensions in the town following the racist murder of Muslim pensioner Mushin Ahmed and repeated demonstrations by groups such as the EDL and Britain First.

South Yorkshire Police assistant chief constable Jason Harwin said that while it is expected Saturday’s demonstration would be allowed to go ahead ‘at this stage’, restrictions may be imposed on where and how it is staged.

He said: “The matter is under constant review. This will include, if necessary, the need to invoke powers under the Public Order Act 1986.

“At this stage the criteria required to prevent a procession is not met but other restrictions may apply including limits on the number of people that can attend, the time and location of the event.

“We will continue to work with all groups and communities to ensure we comply with the law, respecting the rights of all to peaceful protest, balanced against the rights of those affected.

“Minimising any disruption, potential disorder and increased tensions remains a key focus of the planning.

“We fully appreciate the context Rotherham and its communities face, with repeated protest from different groups and we will continue to work with the Home Office to consider the need for potential changes in the legislation.”

READ MORE:

Calls to ban silent march by Pegida group in Rotherham