PAUL DICKOV COLUMN (+AUDIO): Away from football, charity begins at home

During our superb derby win over Leeds United, some of you might have noticed the charity badge I was wearing on my jacket during the game.

It was for Men United, a prostate cancer charity, to help raise awareness which is something that I massively support.

Doncaster Rovers players (l-r) Theo Robinson, Chris Brown, Harry Forrester and Billy Paynter give a present to Sam Bailey, 13, of Skellow on their christmas visit to Doncaster Royal Infirmary. Picture: Andrew Roe

Doncaster Rovers players (l-r) Theo Robinson, Chris Brown, Harry Forrester and Billy Paynter give a present to Sam Bailey, 13, of Skellow on their christmas visit to Doncaster Royal Infirmary. Picture: Andrew Roe

It might have only been a little thing to wear the badge but with all 92 football managers doing it, it can create an effect.

I must admit that I did get a lot of stick from my wife and daughter because during my post-match television interviews at Elland Road, that pin badge was all over the place on my jacket!

But, going back to charity support, it’s important to get involved in these types of worthy causes.

My wife is heavily involved with The Christie Charity (a cancer charity based in Manchester). She’s on the fundraising committee for that.

I’m also a patron of The Eden Dora Trust which is in aid of Eden - the little daughter of our kit man and training ground manager Phil Goldman.

That Trust is trying to create awareness for Encephalitis which is a very rare brain disease that young Eden unfortunately picked up.

There’s not a lot of research into Encephalitis at the minute so to help we’re doing a big fundraising dinner in the summer and One Direction’s Louis Tomlinson is also hopefully getting involved. He’s a patron as well.

I’m very humbled and feel very privileged to try and help wherever I can with charity causes. Whether it’s going to clubs to get auction prizes or buying a table for a fundraising dinner, it’s something I’m happy to help with.

These types of causes make people realise just how lucky they are in all walks of life.

We’re very big at the club here in getting involved with charities, whether it’s going to schools or children’s hospitals or the elderly, we try and make a massive effort to make sure it is a community thing for us as a club.

When I came to Rovers during the summer, as much as the football side was and is massively important, I wanted people in the town to see that we make an effort in the community and feel that we appreciate them and want to give something back.

We’re doing a privileged job but we’re also in a position to help.

It doesn’t do any harm for us, and especially our players, to learn what real life is about sometimes.