My View, Peter Davies: The people of these islands are not fools

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I believe voters are being subjected to one of the most elaborate confidence tricks in the history of democratic politics – the EU Remain Campaign.

David Cameron portrayed himself as a Eurosceptic and gave us a referendum. He promised a campaign to extract big concessions from our continental masters and said if none came he would recommend a ‘leave’ vote.

After a prolonged European odyssey where Cameron was increasingly outmanoeuvred he arrived in back in England with little to show for his negotiations – there was more substance on Neville Chamberlain’s piece of paper wafted in front of the cameras after his legendary meeting with Hitler in 1938.

However, Cameron declared a deal and is campaigning for a remain vote – which he was determined to do anyway. It was easy for the PM to assemble support from the lickspittles on the Tory benches and to get big business on side. Nor was it any challenge to attract the support of politicians who rack up huge sums of money through membership of the European Parliament or its associated gravy trains. And then there was the curious case of Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell (both long-time fierce opponents of the EU) having a synchronised Road to Damascus experience and completely changing their minds.

Thus, supported from the undergrowth by the Liberal Democrats, the stitch-up is firmly in place. With organised support from the IMF, Obama, Merkel, Hollande and all his other international cronies, Cameron must be confident of success. But the people of these islands are not fools – there have been too many distortions in the Remain camp’s arguments; for example:

n “The EU has prevented war and leaving would risk another war.” Potential wars in the last 60 years were prevented by the existence of NATO and nuclear weapons. Whenever countries with no common language or culture have been joined together all have ended in failure or war.

n “The Jungle Camp may move from Calais to Kent.” This is fanciful but, if it did, it would not last long – all the migrants would have reached their destination.

n “Three million British jobs at risk.” Maybe, but if so five million jobs are at risk in the EU if existing trade terms are not agreed.

n “Islamic State would benefit if Britain left the EU.” Ridiculous, since the open borders and Merkel’s offer to take in all refugees makes the activities of IS much easier.

n “Leaving would attract criminals.” The EU already allows criminals to wander around Europe unrestricted.

Think of the referendum vote as an opportunity to land a treble.

Leave the EU, get rid of Cameron and possibly see the Scots achieve independence.