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South Yorkshire family give name to mystery syndrome

David and Cat Lambert,  Bethany, 16, Leon, 14, Dawson, 9, Nyle, 8, and Miya, 7, are all affected by a mystery syndrome.

David and Cat Lambert, Bethany, 16, Leon, 14, Dawson, 9, Nyle, 8, and Miya, 7, are all affected by a mystery syndrome.

Five brothers and sisters from South Yorkshire have been told they’re the only people in the world to suffer a unique genetic condition so rare it might be named after them.

All five children in the Lambert family suffer a disorder predominantly affecting joints and bones - which has left doctors around the planet dumbfounded.

Parents Cat and David, both 37, are seemingly unaffected - but Bethany, 16, Leon, 14, Dawson, nine, Nyle, eight, and Miya, seven, all have the condition.

Each of the children, who are treated at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, has a tell-tale abnormal bone between their eyes, struggles to develop muscle, and has trouble with their joints.

Not all their adult teeth grow and they are prone to developing a twisted spine.

Now, after a half-decade of research, doctors could even name the condition Lambert’s Syndrome after the family from Wath.

Cat said: “Doctors from all over the world have been left puzzled. DNA samples have been sent to experts at Cambridge and Oxford universities.

“They have even sent DNA to experts in America, Canada, Finland and Sweden - but no known syndrome has been discovered yet.” The teaching assistant added: “It seems to affect all the joints in their bodies mainly. So they are either unusable - because they are so stiff - or so overly flexible they dislocate constantly.

“Leon’s fingers used to dislocate around 50 times a day. He used to see it as a party trick when he was younger, but it gets painful after a while.

“But then Dawson can’t even make a fist because his fingers are so stiff.

“I don’t think we’ll ever get to the bottom of what the syndrome is.”

 

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