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Snowdrops melt the heart

Head Gardener at Brodsworth Hall & Gardens, Dan Booth

Head Gardener at Brodsworth Hall & Gardens, Dan Booth

FLOWER power is set to brighten up historic Brodsworth Hall next week.

Visitors to the English Heritage property will be able to enjoy a staggering 500,000 snowdrops which now carpet the grounds of the hall in a spectacular half-term extravaganza.

The fruits of several years of planting are now coming into bloom where the snowdrops, planted alongside the main driveway, are bursting into flower to create a stunning display to herald the start of spring.

A brief warm spell in January has brought Brodsworth’s snowdrops into bloom in early February – a couple of weeks earlier than the last few years – with the white flowers expected to peak in the next week or so, remaining in bloom for a couple of weeks.

The site’s 100,000 yellow aconites are also flourishing, adding a touch of extra colour to the lawns and grounds in anticipation of the daffodils, which traditionally mark the start of spring.

Head gardener Dan Booth said: “The views into the woods from the main driveway look fantastic, with clumps of vibrant green foliage and white flowers bursting from the ground, and we’ve also got some lovely displays down in the rose dell, too, which provide a welcome treat as visitors walk around the gardens,“

“Although the hard landscaping and evergreen topiary ensure that Brodsworth’s restored Victorian gardens look great right through the year, we know that spring is just around the corner as the snowdrops flower and the daffodils start to sprout.”

The gardens – and tea rooms – are open every weekend throughout the winter, from 10am to 4pm.

Admission – including access to the servants’ 
wing of the hall itself – is £5.70 for adults, £5.10 for concessions and £3.40 for children, or free for English Heritage members.

During February half-term, the gardens will be open every day and the snowdrop walk is ideal for parents looking for ideas of what to do with their children during the school holidays and get them out and about.

The servant’s wing gives visitors an insight into the Victorian kitchen as well as the more modern scullery, which is just as it was when it was handed over to English Heritage, complete with cookbooks, Tupperware and Family Circle biscuit tins.

n For more details, call 01302 722598 or visit English Heritage

 

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