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Pollybell sits pretty with a Purdey award

Pollybell Organic Farm, based in Epworth, was presented with a Silver Award at the Purdey Awards for Game & Conservation in London recently. Pictured (L-R) are: Richard Purdey, James Brown, Nigel Brown, Jonathan Young and Miles Bentley.

Pollybell Organic Farm, based in Epworth, was presented with a Silver Award at the Purdey Awards for Game & Conservation in London recently. Pictured (L-R) are: Richard Purdey, James Brown, Nigel Brown, Jonathan Young and Miles Bentley.

OUTSTANDING work in wild game and habitat management has earned the owners of an Isle farm a top industry award,

Pollybell Organic Farm has won a silver award at the 2012 Purdey Awards for Game and Conservation after judges were bowled over with the work the family-run business does to promote organic farming.

Nigel and James Brown, owners of the farm in Wroot Road, Epworth, and head keeper Miles Bentley were honoured at a swanky ceremony in Purdey’s historic long room in Mayfair.

The winners were commended by the judges for their “tremendous work in organic farming, coupled with the success of creating a wild grey partridge shoot.”

As well as the award they received £3,000.

The Brown family acquired the 5,000 acre Pollybell estate in 1994, having realised its potential for organic vegetable production. In 1997 it started its organic farming regime which now extends to 80 per cent of the farmed land.

Diligent keeping, coupled with expert habitat management have resulted in successful development of the estate, that is regularly visited by major supermarket customers as well as by local schools and colleges, who use it as a valuable educational source.

Richard Purdey, who has organised the prestigious Award since 1999, said: “Pollybell Organic Farm is a deserving winner. We set out to give both recognition and reward to projects that achieve exceptional results, and the team at Pollybell have certainly done that.
“We also honour entries where the local community has been involved so wider audiences can learn about the importance of shooting and its connection to conservation.

“We need to remember,” added Mr Purdey, “that without game shooting there would be very little motivation or money to undertake conservation work, and without it our countryside’s carefully managed and balanced eco system would soon unravel and become barren.”
The trio received their award from Jonathan Young, editor of The Field magazine.

 

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