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New treatment hope for brave Alexander

Alexander Strong has been treated to a VIP day at London toy store Hamleys, after generous donations from Epworth and Isle of Axholme Rotary Club, Epworth Taxi, Axholme Taxis, and East Coast Mainline. Pictured back l-r are Alex's mum Maxine Strong, Rotary members Julie Ingelbrecht, Ian Parkin, and Rotary president Debbie Cross. Front l-r are Alex Strong, sister Olivia, nine, and Dad Mark.  Picture: Liz Mockler E1374LM

Alexander Strong has been treated to a VIP day at London toy store Hamleys, after generous donations from Epworth and Isle of Axholme Rotary Club, Epworth Taxi, Axholme Taxis, and East Coast Mainline. Pictured back l-r are Alex's mum Maxine Strong, Rotary members Julie Ingelbrecht, Ian Parkin, and Rotary president Debbie Cross. Front l-r are Alex Strong, sister Olivia, nine, and Dad Mark. Picture: Liz Mockler E1374LM

 

AN Epworth boy who is battling cancer has begun special treatment to prolong his life and allow time to find alternative therapies.

Alexander Strong, of Burnham Road, began his first round of LuDO treatment at University College Hospital in London yesterday.

The treatment will not cure his cancer but could give him precious time while further treatment avenues are explored.

The seven-year-old’s dad Mark told the Epworth Bells the LuDO treatment is a precise form of radiotherapy which targets only cancerous cells.

“It is a lot more accurate than other forms of radiotherapy,” he said.

“We are hopeful this will give us time to look at other forms of treatment.

“Alexander can have this treatment up to four times depending on how he responds to it. We will know more when he has had the first treatment and we’ve seen his scans following it.”

Alexander suffers from a form of cancer called neuroblastoma which only affects children.

And Mr Strong, 46, a chartered engineer, said he was keen to explore the possibility of his son undergoing treatment in Germany called a Haploid Transplant if the treatment in London is successful.

“I’ve attended a conference with experts in London and met a professor from Germany who has told me Alexander might be able to have this Haploid Transplant,” he said.

“We are going to see how he gets on in London and then maybe look at going over to Germany for an appointment before Christmas.”

Haploid Transplant is a form of stem cell treatment which involves healthy cells from a donor being given to the cancer sufferer.

The transplant treatment costs about 120,000 Euros or £100,000 and the family are keen to raise as much money as they can.

Anyone who can help with funds is urged to give visit Alexander’s website www.lexysfund.co.uk and make a donation.

Efforts are also under way to give Alexander as many great experiences to enjoy while he undergoes treatment.

He and his nine-year-old sister Olivia were treated to a VIP day at Hamley’s toy shop in London on November 6, thanks to the efforts of the Rotary Club of Epworth and the Isle of Axholme.

Alexander, Olivia and mum Maxine were given first class rail tickets to King’s Cross, and enjoyed a day in the world’s most famous toy shop.

Alexander’s family are keen to organise more special days and any local businesses or individuals who could help organise any further events are urged to contact them through the website or by emailing lexysfund@btinternet.co.uk

Meanwhile two Epworth authors Rebecca Kershaw and Adele Carrington have just released their first novels and have come up with a fundraising campaign in aid of Alexander.

Rebecca said: “We wanted to do something fun, that would capture people’s imagination and raise money for Alex’s treatment.”

Her new novel Bleed Black and Adele’s book Denial are both available on Amazon and money from buying them will go towards Alex’s fund.

To learn more about the ‘Battle Of Books’ visit www.facebook.com/groups/battleofthebooksforlex

 

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