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Lollipop ladies and gents celebrate 60 years of helping Doncaster kids cross the road

(l-r) Sandra Merrell, of Wadworth, Susan Anderson, of Finningley, and Rachel Green, of Hexthorpe at the 60th anniversary celebrations for school crossing wardens. Picture: Andrew Roe

(l-r) Sandra Merrell, of Wadworth, Susan Anderson, of Finningley, and Rachel Green, of Hexthorpe at the 60th anniversary celebrations for school crossing wardens. Picture: Andrew Roe

Lollipop ladies and gents have celebrated 60 years of Doncaster’s school crossing patrol wardens this week.

The service was founded locally in 1953 and has 56 crossing sites across the borough.

All wardens were invited to the civic office on Tuesday to mark the occasion.

Mayor of Doncaster, Ros Jones, said: “The school crossing service is a vital part of community life. These men and women seek to ensure our children are safe as they cross the road, for which our thanks go to them.

“Some of our staff have been serving for over 35 years, and some have been honoured by being awarded the MBE.”

School Crossing Patrol Wardens first appeared in the United States in the 1920s, and reached the UK in 1945, when they were trialled in Dagenham and other parts of London. The School Crossing Patrol Act 1953 officially recognised school crossing patrols as an entity, meaning they would operate throughout the country, and not just in London.

The School Crossing Patrol Act decreed that any authorised person could stop traffic in order to help children cross the road. Traffic not stopping for a warden could be fined £5 in 1953. Today that could be up to £1000 and 3 penalty points on your licence.

The familiar round “lollipop” sign was introduced in 1960. The service received extra powers in 2001, allowing them to cross adults as well as children.

 

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