DCSIMG

GPs front new cancer campaign

Dr Anna Kirkman from Cantleys Burns Practice and Dr Marco Pieri, based at Petersgate Medical Centre, Scawthorpe, are fronting a new borough-wide health campaign alerting people to the early warning signs of cancer.

Dr Anna Kirkman from Cantleys Burns Practice and Dr Marco Pieri, based at Petersgate Medical Centre, Scawthorpe, are fronting a new borough-wide health campaign alerting people to the early warning signs of cancer.

Two Doncaster GPs are fronting a new borough-wide health campaign alerting people to the early warning signs of cancer.

Dr Anna Kirkman from Cantley’s Burns Practice and Dr Marco Pieri, based at Petersgate Medical Centre, Scawthorpe, are pictured on thousands of medicine bags reminding people of the tell-tale symptoms to look out for.

Symptoms include unexplained blood unrelated to an injury, an unexpected lump, unexplained weight loss, which feels significant, any type of unexplained and persistent pain

Doncaster Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has teamed up with high street pharmacies across the area to launch the campaign, which features four different health messages printed on around 130,000 of the paper bags pharmacists use to dispense medicines to patients.

Dr Kirkman said: “We’re testing out this way of communicating health messages as it literally puts them straight into the hands of patients and the pharmacist is also able to draw attention to them when handing over the medicine bag,”

Two of the three other designs promote Doncaster’s Choose Well campaign, which signpost people to the appropriate local service if they are ill or injured, including being able to download a free specially designed smartphone application. The fourth one targets people who have had a cough for more than three weeks, urging them to see their doctor to make sure it’s not lung cancer.

Dr Pieri said: “The three week cough message is important as Doncaster is currently worse than many other parts of the country for the number of people dying from lung cancer. Early diagnosis and access to treatment will ensure more people to survive the disease.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page