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Church snowdrops herald the arrival of spring

St Mary's Church at Kirk Bramwith is holding its snowdrop festival. Our picture shows Sophie and Hollie Shaw, aged nine and five, of Armthorpe, taking a close up look at some of the snowdrops surrounding the church.

St Mary's Church at Kirk Bramwith is holding its snowdrop festival. Our picture shows Sophie and Hollie Shaw, aged nine and five, of Armthorpe, taking a close up look at some of the snowdrops surrounding the church.

The thermometer might still be saying winter but hundreds of visitors flocked to see some early signs of spring in a picture postcard pretty Doncaster village.

The annual Snowdrop Festival staged in Kirck Bramwith, near Barnby Dun, raises much-needed cash for the Norman village church, St Mary’s.

The churchyard is covered by a carpet of the dainty blooms in mid-February around which the festival is organised. Plant and refreshment stalls also boost the church fundraising.

The church itself is also a draw, boasting some fine stained glass windows and what is believed to be the oldest bell in the Diocese of Sheffield, which was made in York in 1350.

Snowdrop fans still have time to visit the area’s major event, the opening of the woodland gardens at Hodsock Priory, near Blyth.

Featuring snowdrop woodland walks extending to five acres, thousands of visitors make a pilgrimage to the historic house and its gardens every year.

The gardens are open daily from 10am to 4pm until March 3. Admission, including parking is £5 for adults, £1 for children with under 5s free. There is a tea room and a gift shop at Hodsock, fun ares for children and Hodscok history talks.

 

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