Herb’s taste of mediterranean

A Generic Photo of hyssop. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column.
A Generic Photo of hyssop. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column.

Good enough to eat - Hyssop

You may have trouble finding this Mediterranean herb in a supermarket, but the blue, white or pink flowers are lovely in salads or drinks, while the leaves can be used fresh, dried or preserved in olive oil.

This aromatic plant, which is a magnet for butterflies and bees, will thrive in a sunny spot against a south-facing wall and can be grown in any pot of 30cm (12in) diameter or more, with plenty of drainage and light, well-drained compost mixed with grit.

When the flowers appear, feed regularly with comfrey fertiliser and deadhead the plant regularly to keep the hyssop flowering. Plants need to be protected in winter with horticultural fleece if temperatures fall below -5C (23F).