Doncaster Trust chief’s hopes for future

Richard Parker the Director of nursing, midwifery and quality at Doncaster and Bassetlaw NHS Foundation Trust
Richard Parker the Director of nursing, midwifery and quality at Doncaster and Bassetlaw NHS Foundation Trust

Staff at a Doncaster hospital trust failing to meet standards have reassured residents steps have been taken to improve services.

Doncaster and Bassetlaw NHS Foundation Trust was given an overall rating of ‘requires improvement’ by inspectors from the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

As a hospital team we are all disappointed that overall we didn’t receive a good rating

But directors said many of the areas of concern had already been addressed after the unannounced inspection in April.

Richard Parker, the director of nursing, midwifery and quality, said: “I think the next time the inspectors come the staff will absolutely make sure that those standards are met and that we are an organisation that is seen internally as well as externally as being good, if not outstanding, by that stage.”

Among the areas of concern flagged up by inspectors was the potential for people to be unnecessarily exposed to radiation as a result of poor signage around the X-ray department at all four sites – an issue staff now say has been resolved.

Mr Parker said 74 per cent of all of the standards that were assessed were rated as good and the trust narrowly missed out on an overall ‘good’ rating.

He added: “As a hospital team we are all disappointed that overall we didn’t receive a good rating but I think from our point of view and from the patients’ and public’s point of view, they can be reassured that 74 per cent of all of the standards that were assessed were rated as good.”

Bosses said they were confident they had either already completed, or are well under way in completing, the required actions flagged up by inspectors.

The inspections were at Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Bassetlaw Hospital, Montagu Hospital and outpatient services at Retford Hospital.

The report was published just days after it was revealed that bosses at the trust had launched an investigation over a £12 million black hole in its finances.

The trust’s director of finance and infrastructure resigned in the wake of the revelations.

Mr Parker added: “There are concerns around how the position happened and what we’re doing to investigate it.

“The NHS is unfortunately struggling with the financial position at the minute and we’re now one of the organisations where that is the case. But I think like we are focused on quality, we’ll now be focused on making sure financially we recover the position and return to being a financially stable organisation – hopefully in the next year or two.”