Doncaster Mayor demands new HS2 route through borough is scrapped

Computer-generated visuals of a high speed train. HS2. For editorial usage only.
Computer-generated visuals of a high speed train. HS2. For editorial usage only.

Doncaster’s directly elected mayor is demanding that controversial plans to build the HS2 line through the borough are scrapped.

Mayor of Doncaster, Ros Jones, is understood to have made her objections to the new HS2 route, which could see 200 homes in Mexborough demolished, known to a board meeting of the Sheffield City Region Local Enterprise Partnership

Mrs Jones cited concerns that the high-speed line to the Capital would ‘destroy people’s homes, damage communities and impair the town’s ability’ to continue delivering some of the regeneration already taking hold.

Commenting on Mayor Jones’ objections Councillor Sir Steve Houghton CBE, Chair of the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority, said: “All nine LEP local authorities back Government plans to bring High Speed Rail to Sheffield City Region and recognise the benefits that this multi-billion pound project will bring.

“We welcome Government plans to bring High Speed Rail to Sheffield city centre because this option and the potential for a Parkway station would bring significant economic growth and create many jobs in the City Region. However, we recognise that the Government’s new proposals have created significant concerns among areas affected by the proposed line and we understand and respect the Mayor of Doncaster’s decision to ask for alternative station locations to be considered.”

Plans to shift the intended route of HS2 shocked residents when they were announced last month.

The new route would follow the M1 and the M18 before heading north through the borough and on its way to Leeds, cutting between Mexborough and Denaby, and heading on past villages like Barnburgh, Harlingon and Hickleton.

A report with the planned new route said the new housing development between Mexborough and Conisbrough will be affected and there will be ‘impact on the landscape’ in parts of the Rother and Dearne valleys.