Doncaster gang member who hid heroin and cocaine in Kinder eggs is jailed

Adrian Foster has been jailed for possessing drugs with intent to supply, possessing an offensive weapon and possessing cash which wasthe proceeds of crime.
Adrian Foster has been jailed for possessing drugs with intent to supply, possessing an offensive weapon and possessing cash which wasthe proceeds of crime.

A member of a notorious Doncaster criminal gang, who concealed wraps of crack cocaine and heroin in Kinder eggs, has been jailed for drug dealing.

Police officers chased after 21-year-old Adrian Foster who was seen behaving suspiciously in Main Street, Mexborough.

He was seen to throw away a wallet and two Kinder eggs which were later found to contain foil wraps of crack cocaine and heroin, Sheffield Crown Court heard.

His wallet contained £370 and when searched after his arrest he also had a snooker ball wrapped in a sock which he said was for his own protection.

Foster had a tattoo on his hand bearing the initials PSB - short for the Mexborough-based gang Pitsmoor Shotta Boys.

"It is an organised crime gang operating in the Mexborough area which is heavily involved in drug dealing," said Louise Gallagher, prosecuting. "Shotta is the street slang for drug dealing."

In March nine members of the PSB were jailed for a total of over 30 years for drug possession, violent disorder, robbery and witness intimidation.

A tenth gang member was then jailed for attacking a woman with a metal bar.

Since the crackdown began, police have had to send more officers into the town to deal with a wave of anti-social behaviour which has seen a police car windscreen smashed with a brick.

Foster, of Kirby Street, Mexborough admitted two offences of possessing drugs with intent to supply, possessing an offensive weapon and possessing cash which was the proceeds of crime.

He appeared over a court videolink from Doncaster Prison for sentencing.

He was arrested on the morning of Wednesday, April 6. One yellow kinder egg contained 22 wraps of crack cocaine worth £440 on the streets and inside an orange egg were ten wraps of heroin worth £200.

James Gould, defending, said Foster came from a good family, had no previious convictions and had only gone "off the rails" recently.

His mother, who was in court with his father, wrote a letter read by the judge which outlned how quickly her son's life had changed for the worse.

"Given the context of that letter there is some degree of exploitation here," said Mr Gould.

"Searches of his family home revealed nothing, his stock in trade was carried on him. It reveals a true picture. He took all of the risks without any of the reward."

The judge Recorder Ian Harris told Foster: "You had a gang name tattoed on your hand and I'm satisfied that you were allied to a gang."

He said sentencing guidelines recommended prison with a starting point of four years and all drug dealers faced immediate jail terms.

He said dealing in Class A drugs damaged society. "It leads to huge amounts of crime, dreadful poverty, deprivation and degradation."

But he went on: "I am sure you have broken your parents' hearts. They never believed with the background of your first 20 years that you would end up in prison."

He reduced the starting point for the offences and with credit for a guilty plea Foster was jailed for two years and four months.

The judge told Foster: "You ought to be very grateful to your parents for the upbringing they gave you."