Doncaster drug addict stole batteries to fund his drug habit

A bag was stolen from a car in Sheffield
A bag was stolen from a car in Sheffield

A burglar who stole from his neighbour to fund his drug habit has been 
ordered to pay hundreds of pounds in compensation to his victim.

David Thomas Rea, aged 26, of The Homestead, Bentley, admitted stealing two surround-sound speakers and batteries on two occasions from the shed in the garden of a property on Balfour Road, Bentley, at Doncaster Magistrates’ Court.

The court heard Rea was captured on CCTV jumping over the fence of the property, around a 10-minute walk from his home, on the afternoon of October 20 and stealing £420 worth of batteries, which were being stored at the side of the shed.

The next morning, at 7.20am, he returned.

Prosecutor David Shepherd said: “This time, he removed screws from the gate to gain access and then also removed screws from the shed to get in.

“He removed two speakers worth £30. The items were taken away and have not been recovered.”

When Rae was arrested and questioned by police, he admitted he had taken the items to fund his addiction.

“He said he had sold the items, but he couldn’t remember who to.”

Mr Jason Newall, mitigating, said Rea was sorry for his actions and that he was no longer using drugs.

“The offences were committed when he was using drugs and wasn’t getting help for it. He’s now on a course of methadone. It was an issue that was live then, but it’s not live now.”

He added that Rea had not caused any damage to the shed or the fence when the offences took place.

The victim told officers he would like an apology from Rea, and a requisition order asking for this had been sent - but it was not received by Rae as it was delivered to another address, the court heard.

“The police have also said that the complainant was prepared to accept an apology from the person responsible and also £100 in compensation.”

Rea was ordered to pay the full value of the goods in compensation – £450.

He was also handed a 12-month community order, including a 20-day rehabilitation activity requirement.