Candlelit vigil for Holocaust victims

Holocaust Memorial Day event - Don't Stand By - held in All Saints Square in Rotherham.Oakwood High School pupil Thomas Barker adds his pledge to the  on a symbolic ''message tree''. Picture Scott Merrylees
Holocaust Memorial Day event - Don't Stand By - held in All Saints Square in Rotherham.Oakwood High School pupil Thomas Barker adds his pledge to the on a symbolic ''message tree''. Picture Scott Merrylees

Hundreds packed into Sheffield’s Winter Garden to pay their respects for Holocaust Memorial Day.

Around 150 people attended a candlelit vigil in an annual memorial for victims of the Holocaust.

Holocaust Memorial Day event - Don't Stand By - held in All Saints Square in Rotherham. Pupils from St Anns J&I School take part in the proceedings.Picture Scott Merrylees

Holocaust Memorial Day event - Don't Stand By - held in All Saints Square in Rotherham. Pupils from St Anns J&I School take part in the proceedings.Picture Scott Merrylees

Among those at the event were school pupils and people directly affected by the tragedy.

This year’s theme was ‘Don’t Stand By’ - a reference to those who allowed the mass genocide of Jewish people to take place in Nazi Germany.

Rabbi Golomb, of Sheffield Jewish Orthodox Community, said: “It’s important to keep the memory of the holocaust alive so future generations will know what pitfalls humanity can befall.”

Shahida Siddique, of faith group Faithstar, read a poem at the event. She said: “It’s important we stand in solidarity with each other, it doesn’t matter what faith you’re from.”

Holocaust Memorial Day event - Don't Stand By - held in All Saints Square in Rotherham. Local schoolboy Tom Evans makes a speech. Picture Scott Merrylees

Holocaust Memorial Day event - Don't Stand By - held in All Saints Square in Rotherham. Local schoolboy Tom Evans makes a speech. Picture Scott Merrylees

Sheffield Hallam university lecturer Tim Mulroy’s, father and auntie fled Germany just before the Second World War, at the age of 10.

The 51-year-old reflected on the importance of the vigil. He said: “The story needs to be told and retold. It’s an education to remind people they should never forget.”

Sue Pearson was another who fled as a child, aged 11, on special transport to rescue Jewish children from the country.

She said: “10,000 children came to Britain in 1938 and 1939. How many people would take a child in now?”

People also gathered in Rotherham’s All Saints Square to pay respects.

Youngsters performed songs and readings linked to the theme and locals were invited to hang pledges against all forms of hate crime on a ‘message tree’.