Airbrushing argument is flawed

Madame Tussauds unveil a new wax figure of Beyonce Knowles in Regents Park, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday August 20, 2014. Photo credit should read: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire
Madame Tussauds unveil a new wax figure of Beyonce Knowles in Regents Park, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday August 20, 2014. Photo credit should read: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

Every so often something happens in the world of celebrity to reignite the airbrushing argument.

And this time it’s pre-airbrushed pictures of pop icon Beyonce that have sent some into meltdown.

The images posted online appear to be from a 2013 L’Oreal makeup campaign and show Beyonce with blemishes, uneven skin and looking - shock horror - more like a normal human being.

Within seconds scores of fans began posting on social media about the damaging effects airbrushing was placing on society.

Critics lamented the culture claiming it was putting unnecessary pressure on girls striving to look like their idols.

Being constantly bombarded with images of pristine looking celebrities may be mildly irritating, but the sensible folk amongst us take them for what they are.

The idea that Beyonce, who spends hours on long haul flights, shakes her booty on stage on a regular basis and looks after her daughter, doesn’t have a single dark circle or wrinkle is unbelievable.

But can you really blame a multi-million pound beauty big hitter for airbrushing? Probably not.

If Beyonce turns up to shoot a foundation campaign and happens to be having a bad skin day do we really expect them to publish pictures of her looking spotty?

The reality is Queen B looked amazing in both sets of images, but rather than be angry with the airbrushing industry, surely we should celebrate the fact that the pop icon is perhaps more like us then we think.

And as long as we take airbrushed images with a pinch of salt surely there should be no harm done.

As far as I’m concerned realising you’re not going to look like Beyonce just because you buy the same brand of foundation she is advertising is a life lesson we should all learn.

In a similar way that those spritzing their barnet with Elnett hair spray shouldn’t be surprised when they don’t turn out looking like Cheryl Fernandez-Versini.

And tough though it may be to take, we shouldn’t be too disappointed when we discover we don’t look like a Victoria’s Secret angel just because we buy a pair of knickers from the brand.

Whilst campaigners out there may continue to battle for the demise of airbrushing I can’t see this happening anytime soon and I don’t really see why it should.

I’m sure we are all guilty of similar crimes - admittedly on a smaller scale.

I’ll hold my hands up and say I occasionally use different filters on Instagram. If it’s a choice between a filter free end of the night selfie with your make-up sliding off your face, or a filter to make you look like you’ve applied a fresh layer of foundation, I know which one I’d choose.