Aggressive yob headbutted bouncer during Sheffield night out

An 'aggressive' reveller who attacked a bouncer during a night out in Sheffield city centre has been ordered to complete 200 hours of unpaid work.
An 'aggressive' reveller who attacked a bouncer during a night out in Sheffield city centre has been ordered to complete 200 hours of unpaid work.

An 'aggressive' reveller who attacked a bouncer during a night out in Sheffield city centre has been ordered to complete 200 hours of unpaid work.

Peter Scanlon, of Windy House Lane, Woodthorpe had drunk a 'large quantity' of alcohol when he and a group of friends visited Bar One Four One in West Street on the evening of October 22 last year, Sheffield Crown Court heard.

Scanlon's drunken behaviour led to bouncer James Marshall telling the 34-year-old that he needed to leave the premises.

Prosecuting, James Gould, told the court: "The defendant became aggressive when he was asked to leave.

"The defendant tried to head butt the complainant but members of staff intervened and helped the complainant.

"After that the defendant confronted him outside, and headbutted him."

The attack left Mr Marshall with a laceration to his left eyebrow, for which he needed six sutures and a tetanus shot.

He was taken to Northern General hospital for treatment.

Following the attack, Scanlon fled the scene but was found on nearby Glossop Road, where he was arrested by officers.

During police interview, Scanlon told officers he felt he had been treated unfairly in the bar which had led to his violent behaviour.

He was later charged with assault occasioning actual bodily harm, which he pleaded guilty to at the first opportunity.

Defending, Nakkesha Seth, said Scanlon had not been in trouble with the law for violent offences for almost 15 years, and was a hard-working joiner whose job took him all over the country.

Ms Seth asked Recorder Fiona Davies to take this into consideration when imposing her sentence.

Recorder Davies sentenced Scanlon to four months in prison, suspended for two years. She also ordered him to pay his victim £500 in compensation and to complete 200 hours of unpaid work.

"You had drunk a very large quantity of alcohol which no doubt affected your perception of the situation," said Recorder Davies.

She added: "I have read the pre-sentence report in which you say you were greatly ashamed of your behaviour which I hope is true.

"You financially support three members of your family who would suffer if you were locked up.

"I think I am just persuaded, due to the early guilty plea, remorse and the fact it has been 15 years since the last violent offence, to suspend the sentence."