A proud day for Denaby and Conisbro

Irene Brown, the oldest surviving relative unviel the new memorial at the Cadeby Main Colliery Disaster service at Denaby Cemetery. Picture: Andrew Roe

Irene Brown, the oldest surviving relative unviel the new memorial at the Cadeby Main Colliery Disaster service at Denaby Cemetery. Picture: Andrew Roe

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The people of Conisbrough and Denaby can be proud to have finally marked in stone the momentous and terrible events which tore their community apart 100 years ago, when 91 men died in the Cadeby Colliery disaster.

Estimated at between 500 and 1,000 people young and old took part in the memorial day parade to remember those killed in two explosions on and around July 9 1912.

In the first explosion 35 men and boys out of 37 miners lost their lives. In the second 53 rescuers were killed as they attempted to rescue the bodies of their fellow workmen.

Churches at Conisborough, Denaby, Barnburgh, Mexborough and Goldthorpe rang their bells 91 times in memory of the victims.

The Denaby memorial was unveiled by 94-year-old Irene Newton, the oldest surviving relative of one of the victims.

She was joined in laying wreaths by other surviving descendants, politicians councillors and clergy paid their respects.

Conisbrough Poet Benny Wilkinson read out a specially composed piece.

Dodworth Colliery Band and Thurnscoe Harmonic Male Voice Choir were joined by other vocal tributes.

Pupils from De Warrene Academy designed a banner and other schools were represented.

The Cadeby Main Colliery Memorial Group deserve a special mention for their achievement to recognise:

“In memory of the men and boys who paid the ultimate sacrifice in the mining of coal.

No greater sacrifice can any man make than to lay down his life for the safety of others”.