Elsecar by the sea!

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WE’RE back in Elsecar again with this week’s Memory Lane – thanks to yet more marvellous old pictures provided by the village’s Market Hotel.

Our tour starts with a visit to Reform Row.

Built in 1837 by the Earl of Fitzwilliam, to house miners working in the local colliery, we appear to be joining the residents for some sort of royal event, judging by the Union Jack bunting on show.

Elsecar Main pit is shown in operation. It was actually the village’s third pit – the “Old” and “New” collieries having both been abandoned by 1888.

Elsecar Main ran from 1905 until its closure, in October 1983.

The third picture highlights Elsecar’s peculiar fame as a seaside town!

Our photographs this week centre around Elsecar; with Elsecar Main pit, Elsecar's pecular fame as a seaside town and a visit to Reform Row.

Our photographs this week centre around Elsecar; with Elsecar Main pit, Elsecar's pecular fame as a seaside town and a visit to Reform Row.

In 1910 local amateur photographer, Herbert Parkin, took some photographs of the local reservoir.

He sent them to the Sheffield Star with the caption Elsecar-by-the-Sea.

Little did he know how his joke would catch on!

With the help of an excellent rail link from Sheffield, a thriving tourism business was soon established.

Hoyland Council decided to create the public park to take advantage of the influx.

The name is still jokingly used by locals for events at the reservoir and park – which remains a lovely spot, complete with bandstand and pitch-and-putt.